Friday, December 19, 2014

FDF Volume 3 Issue 359 - Guided By Voices - Isolation Drills



Album – Isolation Drills
Artist – Guided By Voices
Key Players – Doug Gillard, Nate Farley, Tim Tobias, Jim MacPherson, Robert Pollard
Produced By – Robert Schnapf

Release Date – April 10, 2001

Overview – This is the 12th studio album from Ohio based indie rock band “Guided By Voices”.  This was the bands first album to crack the Billboard top 200, peaking at #168.  This would be the second, and final record the band would release on the TVT label.

FDF Comments (aka the songs) – The 16 track 47 minute record opens with “Fair Touching”.  Anyone that is familiar with their sound would be right at home.  Pollard has a quiet delivery, but a deep baritone rumbles over the ringing guitars.  The band is pretty tight, keeping the guitar fills short and tight with rhythmic drum fills.  "Skills Like This"  has a bit more of a punchy straight at you rock feel, something that could easily grab a new listener.  "Chasing Heather Crazy"  was a moderate radio single for the band.  The guitars are very clean and Pollard is in fine form and once the full band comes in its laid back pop sense shines.  The track “Frostman” is a very short acoustic based track (under 1 minute) and is almost like and interlude, but it has a demo feel to it at the same time.  The layer of guitars on the build up of “Twilight Campfighter” make for a rewarding listen.  The band seems locked in tight and nobody steps on anyone else, allowing the song to stretch out.  Cello is an underlying layer on

“Sister I Need Wine”.  Mostly acoustic guitar based with the haunting drone of cello and a bit of layers on Pollards vocal track show an unique side of GBV.  “Want One?” rolls right away it feels like it is in part of the last track.  A bit disjointed as it moves along but continues to challenge the listener in a good way.  "The Enemy"  has another “demo” feel to it at the very start, but the great guitar riff grabs you and puts you right back where you want to be...in a happy place.  The riff alone will pull you back in time and time again.  “Unspirited” begins with a solo guitar and Pollard comes in and the call and response vocal verses are a nice touch.  The record is a grower, as it chugs along it feels like it matures, a band finding its direction.  "Glad Girls"  was another track that had a few commercial spins.  Listen for yourself, and if you can do so without wanting a beer (in a can) and jumping around the room you are a better person than I.  “Run Wild” is a bit more dark than the prior few songs, with a slugging guitar, but come the chorus it opens up to another one of the finer tracks on the record.  “Pivotal Film” gives you that one channel guitar, before the full band comes in.  The bass fills are subtle, but big and sweeping which is great, and the layers of vocals on the chorus are another nice touch.  “How's My Drinking?” slows it some form the prior few tracks, which keeps the full mix of the record on point.  Its a longer almost “hook free” track.  An odd name for a track comes in  “The Brides Have Hit Glass”.  One needs to listen to it, to really get the idea. “Fine To See You” is a quieter track with a piano layer (provided by Elliott Smith) gives another dimension to GBV.  Wrapping up is “Privately”a track that suits the record well with its big guitar, tight drumming and bass fills.  A solid closer to a pretty darn solid record.

Where are they now?   The band has had its ups and downs, breaking up, taking breaks etc, right now they are broken up.  For a band that seemingly has and endless output of solo, side projects you won't need to wait too long to hear something you'd be interested in.

FDF Overall Take/Was it worth Dusting Off? - Very much so.  For a casual listener like myself this could be a jump off point.  Its very accessable and has some great hooks on it that should pull even the stuffiest of stuffed shirts in.  Take a chance, there is a massive catalog awaiting you!  The band released two records in 2014, then called it a day in September...so who knows?!

Links, find out more, follow em and buy!



 Disclaimer – I am just a music fan.  Feel free to comment about something that may be written incorrectly about the band/members etc.  I strive to have a fun and enjoyable site.  This site used to post mp3s but ran in to many issues.  The audio clips provided are usually from YouTube.  No copy write infringement is intended.  Please alert me if something should be pulled.  Finally, support the artist featured, or your favorite artist by purchasing their music, seeing their shows if possible and saying hi.  They need your support.


Friday, December 12, 2014

Gone missing...

Morning.
Sorry for the lack of content the last few weeks.  Typical of this time of year I realize.

Will work to have at least one more up before 2014 closes its window.  Been re-listening to a lot of the great things that came out his year as well and prepping my usual "favorite records of XXXX" list.

Thanks for stopping by.  Hopefully next week!

Friday, November 21, 2014

FDF Volume 3 Issue 357 - Ministry - Psalm 69 (The Way to Suceed and the Way to Suck Eggs)


Album - Psalm 69: The Way to Succeed and the Way to Suck Eggs
Artist - Ministry
Key Players – Paul Barker – bass, programming, vocals. Al Jourgensen – vocals, guitar, keyboards. William Rieflin – drums. Mike Scaccia - guitar
Produced By – Hypo Luxa, Hermes Pan

Release Date – July 14, 1992

Overview - This is the fifth studio album from industrial metal band Ministry. Formed in Chicago in 1981 as a synth pop outfit leader Al Jourgensen decided to change directions after a few years, morphing in to the heavier band most know today. This album would break the band in to the mainstream in 1991 with “Jesus Built My HotRod”

FDF Comments (aka the songs) – The 9 song 45 minute record is an absolute assault on the listener. Opening with "N.W.O"  the crunching guitars and drums hit you. You can see the strobe lights. You can smell the smoke and feel the heat of the lights. This is just one loud fucking record. There are layers of samples and when Jourgensen begins the vocals they are nearly unintelligible as he growls the lines under the wall of sound. Scaccia has a short guitar solo in the mid part of the song, but the looping assault of keyboards and drums makes it almost hard to pay attention to. An absolute assault as noted, and we've only just begun. Lifting samples from the film “Sid and Nancy” we are warned to “never trust a junkie” and
"Just One Fix" gets underway. Slicing like a buzz saw the guitars just pummel the listener. You feel dirty after this one. One thing Minstry does is they find that one riff and they latch on to it. The guitars make no change for minutes and everyone else comes in. The drums don't change, the keyboards fill it out and until the chorus its largely locked in the pummeling riffs. The sampled scream that brings the track all back is as resounding today as it was the first time I heard the tune. “TV II” is a very challenging tune to new listeners. The speed of the guitars and drums off set with breaks of heavily distorted (and shouted at you) lyrics. The shortest song on the record, a spot over three minutes the band must have been exhausted even in the studio after playing this. My arms hurt just listening to what Rieflin laid down. “Hero” is one of the cleaner tracks on the song. You get all the mix of the heaviness, and speed, but it just feels “cleaner” and a better example of what the band is all about it. The vocals are still growled at you,but it seems less busy that the prior tracks and is a song you could easily play for someone new to the band to give them a taste of what the band is about.
"Jesus Built My Hot Rod"  was the bands biggest commercial song. Gibby Haynes wrote and sings on the track. If there were a commercial song on the record this would be the one. Even with Haynes nearly indecipherable lyrics. We change gears to the 8+ minute “Scarecrow”. Still a heavy and dark song its just not as rushed as everything else on the record. “Psalm 69” has a big “church” feel to it. With the request to open our prayer books it has the big choir and heavy marching drum. After some “praise Jesus” chants the band comes in and its another brutal assault. “Corrosion” slowly builds up before it opens up. The techno loops feel extra heavy here. This could be used in any horror film ever with flashing lights and cut shots. It ends so heavy the band used the sound of speakers cutting out, almost as if you've blown them. “Grace” concludes the record. Another “horror movie” feeling track but it never seems to grow in to a song like the others. It fits the mood fine, but its a subtle let down from the whole record.

Where are they now? - The band has had numerous changes over the years as well as some set backs.
The band released, what they claim to be their final album “From Beer To Eternity” in September of 2013. There is talk, and a few confirmed live tour dates, scheduled in 2015. Scaccia passed away in December of 2012 of a heart attack

FDF Overall Take/Was it worth Dusting Off? - There was a time I could not get enough of this record and from time to time it really does the trick.  For this reviewer they were at their peak around this time and its probably the first record I'd suggest from them.
Links, find out more, follow em and buy!

Disclaimer – I am just a music fan. Feel free to comment about something that may be written incorrectly about the band/members etc. I strive to have a fun and enjoyable site. This site used to post mp3s but ran in to many issues. The audio clips provided are usually from YouTube. No copy write infringement is intended. Please alert me if something should be pulled. Finally, support the artist featured, or your favorite artist by purchasing their music, seeing their shows if possible and saying hi. They need your support.

Friday, November 14, 2014

FDF Volune 3 Issue 357 - The Beastie Boys - The In Sound From Way Out!





Album – The In Sound from Way Out!
Artist – The Beastie Boys
Key Players – Adam Yauch – bass. Mike D – Drums. Adam Horovitz - guitar
Produced By – Mario Caldato Jnr

Release Date – April 2, 1996

Overview – If you are looking for the rap and hip hop Beastie Boys this is not what you are looking for. If you are looking for three guys crafting some of the coolest jazz funk then you have come to the right place. Recorded in 1996 we were still two years away from “Hello Nasty” and the band, looking to do something different, did just that. The band didn't rush this out as some sort of statement either. Recorded over a span of four years the complexities of this record are really charming.

FDF Comments (aka the songs) – The 13 track 38 minute track opens with “Groove Holmes”. An organ led (played by Mark Ramos Nishita on the record) the band just keeps it low and smooth. The guitar and bass blend well and Mike D is in no hurry so you get that real finger snapping smooth feeling. Horovitz lays down a funk filled wah wah guitar line as “Sabrosa” gets going. Latin percussion once more accompanies before Yauch and D join the fold. Yauch then walks all over the track with a great walking bass line from his upright. “Namaste” is a late night sounding smooth track with keyboards and guitar lightly playing off one another."Pow" is aptly titled as the bass drums and drums come right after you. The guitar breaks and organ fills are prime for that jazz funk moniker. A stellar track that has a great tempo drop. Being a shorter track they really get right after it. “Son of Neckbone” tricks you with the slower intro, but rewards you with the deep groove. The percussion instruments really fill out the sound on the track and D seems to get the most of his drum kit on this one. The track “In 3's” is/was always the stand out for me. I'll just leave it alone and force you to listen to it to figure out why. If you've never heard, enjoy. If you have...you know why
(Listen). “Eugene's Lament” finds the band working with violin (Eugene Gore) and the band is quiet and slowly placing things together like a puzzle. The bass and drums are steady, but the slight plucking of guitar to an short run on the organ keep you wondering where it will all go. It comes back to Gore and his haunting work on the violin. “Bobo On The Corner” is a drum lead track that is just over a minute long. It feels like it could, or should be an intro to another track, but on its own it somehow works with the Mike D drums and Yauch bass line. “Shambala” opens with some throat singers and it is used for the track as an under layer. The track builds slowly around the guitar and drums. Horovitz finds his comfort on a nice repeated guitar line and the band locks in to a tight funk groove. Nishita comes back with the organ work on “Lighten Up”. The band seems to lock in to what Nishita puts down and lets him roll with it, but keeps it all tight. “Ricky's Theme” has a similar feel with much focus on the organ and drums. “Transitions” is another track that uses the slow climb of the keyboard. The bass and guitars get to show off some, but the track just wants to sit tight in the groove and make it unfold. The collection wraps up with “Drinkin Wine” which also happens to be the albums longest track (4:40) The are some back masking, reversed loops being played and it continues to be “backward” song for the duration.

Where are they now? - When Adam Yauch passed away in May of 2012 the Beastie Boys dissolved. Mike D has been working on various projects, and in October 2014 he said he was working with Portugal, The Man as a producer.

FDF Overall Take/Was it worth Dusting Off? - This is a blast to listen to. Sometimes all you need is just that little bit to show you that you can't pigeonhole things. Maybe seen as arrogant at the time (I don't ever recall any sort of fall out) the band just went about and kept busy and creative. A band that is willing to really break the mold is a testament to their desire and abilities. If you can hang on with them you are a bigger fan than you realize.

Links, find out more, follow em and buy!


Disclaimer – I am just a music fan. Feel free to comment about something that may be written incorrectly about the band/members etc. I strive to have a fun and enjoyable site. This site used to post mp3s but ran in to many issues. The audio clips provided are usually from YouTube. No copy write infringement is intended. Please alert me if something should be pulled. Finally, support the artist featured, or your favorite artist by purchasing their music, seeing their shows if possible and saying hi. They need your support.

Friday, November 07, 2014

FDF Volume 3 Issue 356 - Slint - Untitled EP


Album - Untitled

Artist - Slint

Key Players - .Britt Walford- drums. David Pajo – guitar. Brian McMahan – guitar/vocals., Ethan Buckler - bass


Produced By – Steve Albini

Release Date - 1994

Overview – The two song ep was recorded in 1989 before the bands now iconic album “Spiderland” was done. Intended to be a release around the time of the band debut “Tweez” it was shelved due to some record label shifting. In 1994 it was released.

FDF Comments (aka the songs) – It may seem like a cop out doing a 2 song ep as part of a review, but with Slint very little can be taken lightly. Clocking in at just over 13 minutes it begins with
"Glenn" . Buckler rolls a melodic bass line before the drums and guitar come in. Everyone is held back and almost hesitant. Pajo repeats his riff and Walford rolls across his drum kit. The track is locked in to a trippy groove early on and it slowly builds steam. About 1:30 in the band bears down more and the second guitar comes in, with distorted riffs played over the melody that has been laid out. The bulk of the track sticks with this and if you listen a second time you'll hear more of whats going on with the second guitar. Then a third time what the bass line does. It changes and expands with each listen.  "Rhoda" is the second track and its a re-hash of the same tune taken from the bands debut “Tweez”. This is a louder, more in your face track than the first. The guitars really bite at you with the siren like wail and heavily distorted bottom to it all. When Pajo screeches the guitar line and Walford slaps it all back to re-connect you are taken on an heavy and wild ride. The single guitar note attack as Walford seems to find a beat outside the beat. Try to tap your feet to this one and its nearly impossible, yet its tight beyond words. Everyone is doing their own thing, yet it melds as one sonic blast. About 3 minutes in we calm down some and Buckler gets a short moment before its shouted “1-2-3!!” and the band collapses back in. Pajo and McMahon go hard on the guitar and Walford attacks his drum kit like it stole money from him. Bucklers rumbling bass works to fold it all back up nice, but the guitars swirl and battle back and forth, slicing through the track. It slows down, and you can almost envision the band taking a turn sitting down in exhaustion.

Where are they now? - Buckler left the band early on. The biggest story of the band is how they broke up before Spiderland was released. Over the years the album would grow and grow starting to appear on those “best albums ever” lists you see. Its a brilliant and stunning release that is beyond good. The band re-formed in 2005 for a tour, then did another in 2007. They will still occasionally tour (including 2014) but there are no plans for a new Slint record.

FDF Overall Take/Was it worth Dusting Off? - Yes. You might not “get” Slint the first time you listen to them, but listen to them. Soak it in, then listen again. For such a limited output (2 full lengths and an ep) the band has left an amazing legacy. Hip before hipster the band, never mind just this ep, are deserving of your attention.

Links, find out more, follow em and buy!



Disclaimer – I am just a music fan. Feel free to comment about something that may be written incorrectly about the band/members etc. I strive to have a fun and enjoyable site. This site used to post mp3s but ran in to many issues. The audio clips provided are usually from YouTube. No copy write infringement is intended. Please alert me if something should be pulled. Finally, support the artist featured, or your favorite artist by purchasing their music, seeing their shows if possible and saying hi. They need your support.

Friday, October 24, 2014

FDF Volume 3 Issue 355 - Marvin Gaye - The Last Concert Tour


Album – The Last Concert Tour
Artist – Marvin Gaye
Key Players – Marvin Gaye – vocals.
Produced By - (Compiled by) Marc Fieldstone, Trevor G.Shelton and Gerry Young

Release Date – October 29, 1991

Overview – Recorded during his final tour in the summer of 1983 the red hot Marvin Gaye was back on top. With a top 40 hit “Sexual Healing”Gaye found a resurgence in popularity. Less than a year later he'd be dead, shot by his father after an argument.

FDF Comments (aka the songs) – The collection opens up with “Introduction”, which is just simply the emcee introducing Marvin to the stage. It rolls right over to “Third World Girl” which has the band in fine form. One immediate thing you'll notice is the quality of the recording. Gaye's vocals seems distorted and “warbly” at times. The packaging indicates that the disc was recorded live to 2 track stereo tape on analog gear etc etc. That being said, in this day and age live stuff can be cleaned up, at least some. The liner notes don't mention band members either. A rough cut brings you to  “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” which has a different audio source and sounds a little less noisy. Gaye chats up the audience before hand as the band lays down a funky groove. The bass player later in the track finds the slap/pop and great fills. The version is a bit more gritty than the single most would know, and feels even more full with extended horns. “Come Get To This” is a slower ballad where you could see Gaye shirtless singing to a lady in the audience. Its just paints that picture, even if it never happened you can figure it out what the tune feels like. There is a rough and abrupt change and “God Is My Friend” begins. This is a track where you'd wish it all “sounded” better as its Gaye with a solo piano. What could have been..... “What's Going On” follows. Arguably one of, if not his biggest (or very least most well know) track. The band is locked in and Gaye sounds solid hitting all the vocal marks and is in very fine voice. “Ain't Nothing Like The Real Thing” has Gaye taking his time getting started, even offering up a towel he has used to the ravenous female audience. His take on the Ashford and Simpson tune is respectable with his band and backing vocalists. “Your Precious Love” mixes well from the previous with the band still in their pocket ready to rumble forward. Gaye croons calmly and it too then rolls great over to “Love Twins”. Gaye did this song with Donna Summer and mentions her at the start. The bass work is solid and it has that really great groove. The horn section adds a lot, but the bass gets you right there all the time, its a short track that moves right over to “If This World Were Mine”. Gaye does a lot of chatting as “Joy” begins telling the audience about his father being a preacher and watching him be overcome with joy from the lord. This is a track that could really use the clean up. The band is just ripping on this and you can feel the energy, but it still seems compressed. It just needs to be fuller in the mix. The bass line is killer and the sax solo at the end is top notch with the backing vocals really going it just needs that push over the top. The track “Intermission/Interlude” is just that, a jam that must have taken place mid set to allow for a costume change or what have you. “Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)” is the first song after the intermission track and we are back much like the feel of “Joy” Another of the bigger Gaye songs comes in “Let's Get It On” and from the opening guitar wah wah the audience loses their minds and he has them in the palm of his hand. “Distant Lover” slows it down and “Rockin' After Midnight” rolls right back with the funk feel. The song that brought Gaye back in to the public eye in the 1980s was “Sexual Healing” and as the keyboard pops off the keyboard you can hear the audience swell in anticipation and once Gaye sings “lets get down tonight” the audience goes wild. The version is pretty cut and dry, nothing that was broken out from the radio single,but a track he of course needed to do live. There is some interaction with the audience that one would expect. The collection ends with the track “The Final Chapter” which is the band looping on the hook of Sexual Healing and the emcee imploring the audience to give it up “one more time” for Marvin. There is a series of thank yous and Marvin saying he might be done performing live and giving his life to God. Its not really a song, but a moment in time captured that fades out with the audience and band.

Where are they now? Gaye was murdered by his father on April 1, 1984

FDF Overall Take/Was it worth Dusting Off? - Its really a live collection of some of his more well known tunes. The downside to this is just the recording quality. It sounds a bit like a bootleg yet it was released by a major label. Cleaned up somehow it might be worth a re-visit, but even with all the hits and Gaye back in the public eye even the most casual of music fans will be put off by the quality of the recording.

Links, find out more, follow em and buy!



Disclaimer – I am just a music fan. Feel free to comment about something that may be written incorrectly about the band/members etc. I strive to have a fun and enjoyable site. This site used to post mp3s but ran in to many issues. The audio clips provided are usually from YouTube. No copy write infringement is intended. Please alert me if something should be pulled. Finally, support the artist featured, or your favorite artist by purchasing their music, seeing their shows if possible and saying hi. They need your support.

Friday, October 10, 2014

FDF Volume 3 Issue 354 - Animal Logic - Self Titled.


Album – Animal Logic

Artist – Animal Logic

Key Players – Deborah Holland – vocals. Stewart Copeland – drums. Stanley Clarke – bass

Michael Thompson – guitar and banjo

Produced By – Stanley Clarke and Stewart Copeland

Release Date - 1989

Overview – This is the debut record from the band “Animal Logic”. The trio consisted of Deborah Holland on vocals, Stewart Copeland, well know for his work as the drummer in the Police and jazz bass player Stanley Clarke. The band would not last very long, releasing just two records.



FDF Comments (aka the songs) – The ten tracks clock in just shy of 40 minutes. The album opens with
 "There's A Spy (In The House of Love)" ”. Right away you are greeted with the solid and strong vocals of Holland. Coupled with the systematic drumming of Copeland and rich bass fills from Clarke, you are in for a ride. “Someday We'll Understand” is awash with atmospheric keyboards and again as Holland begins to sing you are pulled in. She has a very strong voice. There is a bit more pop in Clarke’s bass work and Copeland shines as expected. Michael Thompson is the guitarist on all the tracks and he has a nice intro as “Winds of Santa Ana” begins. The track has a little less driving force at the start and its a bit more of a laid back delivery, yet Holland still pushes her range, and it is especially noticeable during the chorus. A bit more acoustic/flamenco guitar greets you as “I'm Through With Love” and it has a fun tempo. The band is not locked in to one style, which keeps you guessing and the listen all the more refreshing. Copeland is right out of the gates on "As Soon As The Sun Goes Down" as it starts as the prior song is fading. Clarke joins in the party and the two lock in to a groove before Holland comes in. Another solid effort. “I Still Feel For You” finds Copeland with that trade mark cymbal work. His drum strikes are always so punchy and you know right away it shim playing. The chorus is solid and the band continues the path of catchy tracks. Clarke gets his due at the intro on “Elijah” and the band then settles in. There is a bit more banjo work from Thompson on this track, but Clarke still continues to find that solid bottom. “Firing Up the Sunset Gun” finds that bass sounds that has made Clarke well known and the he kicks back to let Holland open up. The more I listen the more I tend to fall in love with Hollands voice. She really shines. “Someone To Come Home To” finds the band at about their “rocking-ness” and its a good shell to come out of. “I'm Sorry Baby (I Want You In My Life)” wraps up the record and the track has horns and is much more piano led then we've gotten used to. Its a pretty song, ends the record on sort of a down note though.

Where are they now? - The band dissolved and the members have been on to other projects. Copeland and Clarke work in various bands and produce etc. Clarke has a new album that came out on September 30th. Holland has released seven albums since the demise of the band. A few under the band “Refugees” and a few solo albums.

FDF Overall Take/Was it worth Dusting Off? - Musically it is a a terrific record. There are some very talented and skilled players on the record. It might be a bit too campy for some. Not sure if the lyrics are corny or not., but it feels a bit more like a record your Mom would listen to. Not that its a bad thing, your mom has incredible taste. Might not pull you in all the time, but I find it a rewarding collection of songs.

Links, find out more, follow em and buy!





Out of print but you can find  here

Disclaimer – I am just a music fan. Feel free to comment about something that may be written incorrectly about the band/members etc. I strive to have a fun and enjoyable site. This site used to post mp3s but ran in to many issues. The audio clips provided are usually from YouTube. No copy write infringement is intended. Please alert me if something should be pulled. Finally, support the artist featured, or your favorite artist by purchasing their music, seeing their shows if possible and saying hi. They need your support.